Mindgoop's goopy brain.
wvm:

Recording vocals at Blue Room studio with @seanbeavan for new album #wavesofnothing coming very soon #WVM

wvm:

Recording vocals at Blue Room studio with @seanbeavan for new album #wavesofnothing coming very soon #WVM

sdzoo:

Even Galapagos tortoises enjoy watermelon in the summer. Watch the full video.

stuffman:

image

People have written a lot of touchy-feely pieces on this subject but I thought I’d get right to the heart of the matter

I feel so much better now

tobiasxva:


I need this

tobiasxva:

I need this

highpeakratrescue:

remind me why I bother to blog anything on here and maybe I will post more pics one day

not on here much these days so I thought I would drop in and see what’s happening - seems Tumblr is gradually recovering from its sale in 2013 and becoming good again. Happy to see that, was going to close down my Tumblr account(s).

rhamphotheca:

Mysterious 500 Million-Year-Old Ocean Predators Could Be the Ancestors of Spiders
by Annalee Newitz
Anomalocarids are one of the oldest families of animals on Earth, and they looked like nightmarish sea scorpions. But a new fossil discovery actually contains traces of their brain structure — and amazingly, their half-billion-year-old brains look a lot like an arachnid’s.
Though some anomalocarids may have been as big as 7 feet long, these newly-discovered specimens are closer to the size of today’s arachnids. The critters you see fossilized below are about 8 cm long. Still, they look pretty insane — especially when you consider that their segmented heads are so similar to what we’d see in an arachnid today. A team of paleontologists led by Peiyun Cong found the three gorgeously-preserved anomalocarid fossils in Yunnan Province, and described them today in Nature…
(read more at io9)
Anomalocarid illustration by John Meszaros

rhamphotheca:

Mysterious 500 Million-Year-Old Ocean Predators Could Be the Ancestors of Spiders

by Annalee Newitz

Anomalocarids are one of the oldest families of animals on Earth, and they looked like nightmarish sea scorpions. But a new fossil discovery actually contains traces of their brain structure — and amazingly, their half-billion-year-old brains look a lot like an arachnid’s.

Though some anomalocarids may have been as big as 7 feet long, these newly-discovered specimens are closer to the size of today’s arachnids. The critters you see fossilized below are about 8 cm long. Still, they look pretty insane — especially when you consider that their segmented heads are so similar to what we’d see in an arachnid today. A team of paleontologists led by Peiyun Cong found the three gorgeously-preserved anomalocarid fossils in Yunnan Province, and described them today in Nature

(read more at io9)

Anomalocarid illustration by John Meszaros

train-to-win:

fivegaited:

mievzar-equus:

fivegaited shared this post about head-pressing in cats and dogs and I wanted to share with everyone that head-pressing can be seen in horses as well. 

Head pressing can be a sign that a horse is suffering from a dysfunction of the central nervous system.

Equine Viral Encephalomyelitis could be the cause. (HOWEVER, it is not the ONLY possible cause!)

These viral disorders, usually transmitted by mosquitoes or other blood-feeding insects, involve central nervous system dysfunction and moderate to high mortality.

This includes:

  • West Nile encephalomylitis
  • Eastern equine encephalitis
  • Western equine encephalitis
  • Venezuelan equine encephalitis

If your horse starts to display head-pressing, it’s a good idea to call your veterinarian and have your horse examined as soon as possible.

This is also why it is so important to vaccinate your horses regularly!

(DISCLAIMER)

[ Source: Image 1 | Image 2 | Image 3 ]

THANK YOU this is really good and important info, everyone should share this!!

I didn’t know that. I thought it was like a boredom thing?

dendroica:

A double rainbow lights up spectacular scenery in Kirkjufell, Iceland. Picture: Peter Rolf Hammer/HotSpot Media (via Pictures of the day: 4 June 2014 - Telegraph)

dendroica:

A double rainbow lights up spectacular scenery in Kirkjufell, Iceland. Picture: Peter Rolf Hammer/HotSpot Media (via Pictures of the day: 4 June 2014 - Telegraph)